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President Tashni-Ann Dubroy Makes Post-election Promise to Shaw students

In a candid conversation in Thomas J. Boyd Chapel, President Dr. Tashni-Ann Dubroy assured students, faculty and staff that Shaw University leaders are focused and ready to advocate for students and HBCUs everywhere in the wake of the election of Donald Trump as U.S. President. “This is a very critical time for us as a nation,” she said.  “We will be acting. We will not be silent.”

Just days after Trump beat Hillary Clinton in the Nov. 8 election, Dubroy invited the Shaw family to gather to talk about the election that has left America divided and many feeling hopeless. And, because HBCUs nurture, Dubroy surprised each student in attendance with a $20 Wal-Mart or Target gift card.

Sitting alongside their professors, chaplain and leaders, some of the 120 students in attendance expressed fears about the state of education and queried about the role the Electoral College played in the election outcome. They also reassured themselves, resting on the power of resilience, action and raising their voices.

“As a student, I feel nervous for all of us; our education, our future,” said Jaelyn Harris, a senior Business Administration major from Henderson, NC. “Financial aid and government assistance are the only ways most of us can afford our education.”

Although Clinton’s campaign, which included a stop at Shaw, outlined a platform that earmarked about $25 billion for HBCUs, no one is certain about how president-elect Trump will proceed once he’s in office, Dubroy explained. “That’s the part of the conversation we’re all concerned about,” she said. “What we’re doing is guessing; guessing what he will do based on what he said on the campaign trail.”

That guess, Dubroy said, suggests an anticipated repeal of the pro-education stance of the Obama administration; perhaps, including a reduction in grants and other assistance many students rely on. “That means college will become less affordable,” Dubroy said.

To determine the direction of impact on higher education and HBCUs in particular, Dubroy described hers as a bipartisan focus that seals her leadership through awareness, a seat at the table and a voice to be heard. “I can’t lean on one party, or the other,” she said. “I have to ensure I understand the platforms of Democrats and the platforms of the Republicans – and advocate for HBCUs at-large.

“We still have voices. We still have power.”

Elections roll around every two years, Dubroy said. That’s when students must act, voting on issues that impact theirs and future generations, and the candidates who support them. Dubroy also issued a plea for help should there be a need to write letters to lawmakers or march on Capitol Hill in pursuit of bipartisan support of higher education and Shaw’s place in its halls.  

Moving forward, “I want you to really walk with your backs straight,” Dubroy urged. She also told students to use the experience of the election and its outcome to help them zero in on why they’re in college, why education is so important. “If this Election 2016 doesn’t motivate you…then, I don’t know what will,” she challenged.

For Junior Class President Tyler Ford, the morning after the election was “kind of sad and gloomy,” said the native of Stone Mountain, Ga. “I couldn’t understand why America is moving backward; why America doesn’t value my life. But then I realized: I’m still the same me, and I’m still getting my education.”

Calling it “our moment in history,” Ford said, “It’s our time. Any sadness we feel should motivate us. Find courage. Find hope. Learn more about politics. It’s up to us to change the tide of history.”

Alabama native and Shaw Bear Football strong safety Rashad Mosley pointed to the strength of mind, body and spirit historically owned by African-Americans through racism and subsequent social injustices. “We are strong people,” said Mosley, an Exercise Science major. “We are history in the making. Change is possible, and we can still do a lot of things to make change happen.”>

Shaw’s Soccer coach Luis Cortell expressed support. “This is not about color or race,” said Cortell, adding his rosters hold the school’s largest international population. “We’re all the same; here together. It is a difficult time for us all because we are Shaw U, too. We are you.”

Ultimately, Dubroy said, students must focus on why they’re at Shaw University and who they’ll become. “We’ve now got to activate excellence,” she said. “Don’t lose hope. There are still some really good people in the world, and that’s what you’ve got to focus on: Being a good person.

As for Shaw leaders, Dubroy added, “The burden of higher education strategy is on us.”

Despite the results of the presidential election Dubroy vows to defend higher education and HBCUs

In a candid conversation in Thomas J. Boyd Chapel, President Dr. Tashni-Ann Dubroy assured students, faculty and staff that Shaw University leaders are focused and ready to advocate for students and HBCUs everywhere in the wake of the election of Donald Trump as U.S. President. “This is a very critical time for us as a nation,” she said.  “We will be acting. We will not be silent.”

Just days after Trump beat Hillary Clinton in the Nov. 8 election, Dubroy invited the Shaw family to gather to talk about the election that has left America divided and many feeling hopeless. And, because HBCUs nurture, Dubroy surprised each student in attendance with a $20 Wal-Mart or Target gift card.

Sitting alongside their professors, chaplain and leaders, some of the 120 students in attendance expressed fears about the state of education and queried about the role the Electoral College played in the election outcome. They also reassured themselves,

“As a student, I feel nervous for all of us; our education, our future,” said Jaelyn Harris, a senior Business Administration major from Henderson, NC. “Financial aid and government assistance are the only ways most of us can afford our education.”

Although Clinton’s campaign, which included a stop at Shaw, outlined a platform that earmarked about $25 billion for HBCUs, no one is certain about how president-elect Trump will proceed once he’s in office, Dubroy explained. “That’s the part of the conversation we’re all concerned about,” she said. “What we’re doing is guessing; guessing what he will do based on what he said on the campaign trail.”

That guess, Dubroy said, suggests an anticipated repeal of the pro-education stance of the Obama administration; perhaps, including a reduction in grants and other assistance many students rely on. “That means college will become less affordable,” Dubroy said.

To determine the direction of impact on higher education and HBCUs in particular, Dubroy described hers as a bipartisan focus that seals her leadership through awareness, a seat at the table and a voice to be heard. “I can’t lean on one party, or the other,” she said. “I have to ensure I understand the platforms of Democrats and the platforms of the Republicans – and advocate for HBCUs at-large.

“We still have voices. We still have power.”

Elections roll around every two years, Dubroy said. That’s when students must act, voting on issues that impact theirs and future generations, and the candidates who support them. Dubroy also issued a plea for help should there be a need to write letters to lawmakers or march on Capitol Hill in pursuit of bipartisan support of higher education and Shaw’s place in its halls.  

Moving forward, “I want you to really walk with your backs straight,” Dubroy urged. She also told students to use the experience of the election and its outcome to help them zero in on why they’re in college, why education is so important. “If this Election 2016 doesn’t motivate you…then, I don’t know what will,” she challenged.

For Junior Class President Tyler Ford, the morning after the election was “kind of sad and gloomy,” said the native of Stone Mountain, Ga. “I couldn’t understand why America is moving backward; why America doesn’t value my life. But then I realized: I’m still the same me, and I’m still getting my education.”

Calling it “our moment in history,” Ford said, “It’s our time. Any sadness we feel should motivate us. Find courage. Find hope. Learn more about politics. It’s up to us to change the tide of history.”

Alabama native and Shaw Bear Football strong safety Rashad Mosley pointed to the strength of mind, body and spirit historically owned by African-Americans through racism and subsequent social injustices. “We are strong people,” said Mosley, an Exercise Science major. “We are history in the making. Change is possible, and we can still do a lot of things to make change happen.”

Shaw’s Soccer coach Luis Cortell expressed support. “This is not about color or race,” said Cortell, adding his rosters hold the school’s largest international population. “We’re all the same; here together. It is a difficult time for us all because we are Shaw U, too. We are you.”

Ultimately, Dubroy said, students must focus on why they’re at Shaw University and who they’ll become. “We’ve now got to activate excellence,” she said. “Don’t lose hope. There are still some really good people in the world, and that’s what you’ve got to focus on: Being a good person.

As for Shaw leaders, Dubroy added, “The burden of higher education strategy is on us.”